Rare screenings of iconic Crass films at Firstsite coming up

Over two nights at Firstsite we show a selection of Crass Films.

On Thursday 26th January we show Christ – The Movie from Mick Duffield.
Christ the Movie is made up of three films, ‘Autopsy’, ‘Choosing Death’ and ‘Yes Sir, I Will’ (Crass). Made in the punk rock era in response to the UK’s gloomy political and economic bankruptcy of the mid-1970’s and 80’s. These films were shown at the Crass gigs and contributed to the atmosphere of each performance. The films will be preceded by a screening of Tea Piece, also by Mick Duffield.

A collection of Crass films (1978 – 1984) by Mick Duffield
Thursday 26th January 2017 7:30pm Book Tickets

On Friday 10th February we will be showing a selection Crass films made by Gee Vaucher member of Crass and the artist behind their groundbreaking graphic art. Made between 1978-1984, these films are visual extensions of the music and ideas of Gee and Crass and were shown during all of their gigs. The films will also be preceded by a showing of Tea Piece by Mick Duffield.
A collection of Crass films (1978 – 1984) by Gee Vaucher.
Friday 10th February 2017 7:30pm Book Tickets

About Crass
Crass were an English collective and punk rock band formed in 1977[1][2] which promoted anarchism as a political ideology, a way of life and a resistance movement. Crass popularised the anarcho-punk movement of the punk subculture, advocating direct action, animal rights, feminism and environmentalism. The band used and advocated a DIY punk ethic approach to its sound collages, leaflets, albums and films.

Crass spray-painted stencilled graffiti messages in the London Underground system and on advertising billboards, coordinated squats and organised political action. The band expressed its ideals by dressing in black, military-surplus-style clothing and using a stage backdrop amalgamating icons of perceived authority such as the Christian cross, the swastika, the Union Jack and the ouroboros.

The band was critical of punk subculture[3] and youth culture in general. Crass promoted an anarchism which became more common in the punk-music scene.[4] They are considered art punk[5] in their use of tape collages, graphics, spoken word releases, poetry and improvisation. Via:Wikipedia